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Thread: Bittorrent tool for OpenWrt router (ARMv7)?

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    Bittorrent tool for OpenWrt router (ARMv7)?

    Hello all.

    I own an OpenWrt router (ARMv7 architecture) which is 24/7 on, and I would like to ask if there is any possibility of running a Bittorrent tool for fake seeding (100%) at no upload speed.

    I am currently seeding with a legitimate Transmission 2.92 client and a 8-bay NAS enclosure connected to the USB3.0 port. I have very high ratios in all the trackers I am in and I would like to avoid having the disks spinning 24/7, especially when I am abroad for weeks, as I only need to seed at no upload speed to either avoid h&r or gain seeding/bonus points.

    I would need an ipk modded client compatible with ARMv7 or something like that. OpenWrt cannot run JAVA so I cannot run JOAL, and most tools (mRatio, RM...) are not compatible with ARM chipsets. I know it could be acomplished by buying a Pi3B or any low-powered Linux box and leaving it 24/7 but I would like to acomplish it without needing to invest in more hardware.

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by sharktachi; 01.11.18 at 13:43.
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    Moderator anon's Avatar
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    Modding a client's source code to always report 100% done with no upload or download traffic is very easy. Then you'd only have to cross-compile it for your platform and readd your torrents without any files selected. Cross-compilation can be a real nightmare, though... but it may be possible to patch the binary in the repositories to do this, tell me what your router is and I'll have a look.

    Also, OpenWrt can allegedly run Java applications through JamVM, but I was unable to make it work.
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    Quote Originally Posted by anon View Post
    Modding a client's source code to always report 100% done with no upload or download traffic is very easy. Then you'd only have to cross-compile it for your platform and readd your torrents without any files selected. Cross-compilation can be a real nightmare, though... but it may be possible to patch the binary in the repositories to do this, tell me what your router is and I'll have a look.

    Also, OpenWrt can allegedly run Java applications through JamVM, but I was unable to make it work.
    Thank you a lot for the support.

    I have a Linksys WRT1900AC with OpenWrt 18.06.1. It is an ARM-cortex-a9-vfp3 based router.

    In the official repository there is a Transmission (v2.93) precompiled for it working like a charm (https://downloads.openwrt.org/releas...fpv3/packages/).

    Transmission is a modular client (cli, remote, web, daemon...), but I guess only modifying the daemon module (transmission-daemon-openssl_2.93-7_arm_cortex-a9_vfpv3.ipk), as it is the "core", to report 100% done will be enough.

    PD: There is also official support for rTorrent (v0.9.6) in case it is easier to mod.
    Last edited by sharktachi; 02.11.18 at 19:04.
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    Moderator anon's Avatar
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    I have just sent you a PM, since the potential risks of discussing what I wanted to say publicly outweigh the potential rewards.
    "Come visit sometime, okay? We'll always be here for you. We... we all love you."
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    Quote Originally Posted by anon View Post
    I have just sent you a PM, since the potential risks of discussing what I wanted to say publicly outweigh the potential rewards.
    Thank you a lot here too :)
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    Well, after 2 days of 24/7 use I must say it works 100%.

    Thanks a lot again, @anon.
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    what write speeds are you getting and what filesystem do you use in your NAS? I tried NTFS but I gave up when I faced reality with its horrific write&read performance (2mbits) on a disk that was capable of 1gbits+, that's 0.2%. Mine was a MIPS CPU, WDR4300 model with USB 2.0 port. Then i got extremely disappointed with the Samba performances too, and decided to abandon the whole project until a new router arrived, or go x86 which to this date isn't out of question.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fernandk View Post
    what write speeds are you getting and what filesystem do you use in your NAS? I tried NTFS but I gave up when I faced reality with its horrific write&read performance (2mbits) on a disk that was capable of 1gbits+, that's 0.2%. Mine was a MIPS CPU, WDR4300 model with USB 2.0 port. Then i got extremely disappointed with the Samba performances too, and decided to abandon the whole project until a new router arrived, or go x86 which to this date isn't out of question.
    I am using ext4 as FS, as NTFS gave me very poor results aswell. I prefer using always native FS on systems based on GNU/Linux
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    Moderator anon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharktachi View Post
    Well, after 2 days of 24/7 use I must say it works 100%.

    Thanks a lot again, @anon.
    Nice, I'm pleased it was a success

    Quote Originally Posted by fernandk View Post
    what write speeds are you getting and what filesystem do you use in your NAS? I tried NTFS but I gave up when I faced reality with its horrific write&read performance (2mbits) on a disk that was capable of 1gbits+, that's 0.2%.
    NTFS support for Linux is implemented in userspace, which means the processor becomes a bottleneck and all else being equal, it will never be as fast as a native file system. Going to x86 will elevate this ceiling, but not remove it (speeds in MB/s are in the lower 30s for a typical desktop system). Also, you were never going to get gigabit speeds over USB 2.0 either way...

    Bottom line, just use ext4, support is guaranteed and it will work best. This alone should get your Samba a decent performance boost. You could also tell iptables not to conntrack SMB traffic and experiment with your mount options, maybe also create a swap partition if you haven't already (even though your router has plenty of RAM).
    "Come visit sometime, okay? We'll always be here for you. We... we all love you."
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